Saturday, January 21, 2017

Propolis Mouthwash Prevents Oral Mucositis in Leukemic Patients

Efficacy of Hypozalix spray and propolis mouthwash for prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in leukemic patients: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

J Dent Res Dent Clin Dent Prospects. 2016 Fall;10(4):226-233

Background. Oral mucositis is the chief complication of head and neck chemotherapy. This study was conducted to evaluate Hypozalix artificial saliva and propolis mouthwash efficacy for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in leukemic patients.

Methods. The present double-blind clinical trial was carried out on 72 patients undergoing chemotherapy. The patients were assigned to 3 groups. In the control group, CHX mouthwash and fluconazole were used by the subjects. In groups 1 and 2, Hypozalix and propolis mouthwashes were added to the combination therapy used in the control group. The results were compared between the three groups after 14 days.

Results. Mean score A was significantly higher than mean score B in children (P = 0.001). In contrast, mean score A was significantly lower than mean score B in young adults (P = 0.003).

Conclusion. Use of Hypozalix spray or propolis mouthwash in association with CHX mouthwash and fluconazole simultaneously at the start of chemotherapy resulted in a decrease in chemotherapy complications after 14 days. In many cases the use of propolis mouthwash yielded better results and the patients exhibited a greater tendency to continue to use it.

Friday, January 20, 2017

Algerian Propolis Extracts Show Bactericidal Activity in Aquaculture

Algerian propolis extracts: Chemical composition, bactericidal activity and in vitro effects on gilthead seabream innate immune responses

Fish Shellfish Immunol. 2017 Jan 9

Propolis has been used as a medicinal agent for centuries. The chemical composition of four propolis samples collected from four locations of the Sétif region, Algeria, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was determined.

More than 20 compounds and from 30 to 35 compounds were identified in the aqueous and ethanolic extracts, respectively. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of the propolis extracts against two marine pathogenic bacteria was evaluated.

Finally, the in vitro effects of propolis on gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) leucocyte activities were measured. The bactericidal activity of ethanolic extracts was very high against Shewanella putrefaciens, average against Photobacterium damselae and very low against Vibrio harveyi. The lowest bactericidal activity was always that found for the aqueous extracts. When the viability of gilthead seabream head-kidney leucocytes was measured after 30 min' incubation with the different extracts, both the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of one of the propolis samples (from Babor) and the aqueous extract of another (from Ain-Abbassa) provoked a significant decrease in cell viability when used at concentrations of 100 and 200 μg ml-1.

Furthermore, significant inhibitory effects were recorded on leucocyte respiratory burst activity when isolated leucocytes where preincubated with the extracts. This effect was dose-dependent in all cases except when extracts from a third propolis sample (from Boutaleb) were used.

Our findings suggest that some of Algerian propolis extracts have bactericidal activity against important bacterial pathogens in seabream and significantly modulate in vitro leucocyte activities, confirming their potential as a source of new natural biocides and/or immunomodulators in aquaculture practice.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Vaginal Royal Jelly Effective in Quality-of-Life Improvement for Postmenopausal Women

Comparison between vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen effects on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women: a clinical trial study

Electron Physician. 2016 Nov 25;8(11):3184-3192

OBJECTIVE:

This study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic effects of vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women.

METHODS:

This double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out at gynecology and obstetrics clinics of Hajar Hospital of Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences (Iran) from January 2013 to January 2014. The study was conducted on married postmenopausal women between 50 and 65 years old. Of 120 patients, 30 individuals were excluded based on the exclusion criteria, and 90 women were randomly distributed into three groups of 30 royal jelly vaginal cream 15%, vaginal Premarin, and placebo (lubricant), for three months. At the beginning and the end of the study, quality of life and vaginal cytology assay were evaluated. Data were analyzed by SPSS Version 11.

RESULTS:

Vaginal cream of royal jelly is significantly more effective than vaginal cream of Premarin and lubricant in improvement of quality of life in postmenopausal women (p<0 .05="" and="" atrophy="" between="" difference="" group="" groups="" in="" jelly="" lower="" lubricant="" moreover="" no="" other="" p="0.89).</p" pap="" premarin="" results="" royal="" showed="" significant="" smear="" than="" that="" the="" there="" vaginal="" was="">
CONCLUSION:

Administration of vaginal royal jelly was effective in quality-of-life improvement of postmenopausal women. Given to the various properties of royal jelly and its effectiveness on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women, further studies are recommended for using =royal jelly in improving menopausal symptoms.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Thyme Honey Effective in Managing Xerostomia in Cancer Patients

The effectiveness of thyme honey for the management of treatment-induced xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients: A feasibility randomized control trial


European Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume 27, April 2017, Pages 1–8

Highlights

• Thyme honey was found effective in managing various grades of xerostomia in patients diagnosed with H&N cancers.
• The study showed that thyme honey was safely used as a mouthwash for the management of treatment induced xerostomia.
• The effectiveness of thyme honey in xerostomia was assessed against overall quality of life, pain and dysphagia.

Radiation-induced xerostomia is one of the most common side effects that head and neck cancer patients experience during and after treatment. Despite the various methods for the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia, it remains highly prevalent among patients treated for head and neck cancers negatively influencing their lives. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of thyme honey as a means for managing radiation-induced xerostomia.

Royal Jelly Helps Treat Obesity

Royal jelly ameliorates diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance by promoting brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in mice

Obes Res Clin Pract. 2017 Jan 11

INTRODUCTION:

Identification of thermogenic food ingredients is potentially a useful strategy for the prevention of obesity and related metabolic disorders. It has been reported that royal jelly (RJ) supplementation improves insulin sensitivity; however, its impacts on energy expenditure and adiposity remain elusive. We investigated anti-obesity effects of RJ supplementation and their relation to physical activity levels and thermogenic capacities of brown (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT).

METHODS:

C57BL/6J mice were fed under four different experimental conditions for 17 weeks: normal diet (ND), high fat diet (HFD), HFD with 5% RJ, and HFD with 5% honey bee larva powder (BL). Spontaneous locomotor activity, hepatic triglyceride (TG) content, and blood parameters were examined. Gene and protein expressions of thermogenic uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX-IV) in BAT and WAT were investigated by qPCR and Western blotting analysis, respectively.

RESULTS:

Dietary RJ, but not BL, suppressed HFD-induced accumulations of WAT and hepatic TG without modifying food intake. Consistently, RJ improved hyperglycemia and the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Although dietary RJ and BL unchanged locomotor activity, gene and protein expressions of UCP1 and COX-IV in BAT were increased in the RJ group compared to the other experimental groups. Neither the RJ nor BL treatment induced browning of WAT.

CONCLUSION:

Our results indicate that dietary RJ ameliorates diet-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, and hepatic steatosis by promoting metabolic thermogenesis in BAT in mice. RJ may be a novel promising food ingredient to combat obesity and metabolic disorders.

VIDEO: Manuka Honey and Cancer (Arabic)


WATCH THE VIDEO: 1/15/2017

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Propolis Boosts Immunomodulatory/Anti-inflammatory Effects of Mouthwash

Immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory effects of a propolis-containing mouthwash on human monocytes Restricted access 

Pathogens and Disease

Propolis is a bee product used in folk medicine to improve health and prevent inflammatory diseases. It has attracted the attention of researchers from the odontological field lately, reducing inflammation resulting from surgical procedures and as an antimicrobial agent in the control of bacterial plaque. Thus far, no side-effects that might compromise oral health have been observed.

Chlorhexidine is an antimicrobial agent widely used as an antiseptic, but side-effects restrict its use. This work investigated the effects of an odontological product containing propolis in combination with chlorhexidine in lower concentrations on human monocytes. Cell marker expression, the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway, the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and the bactericidal activity of these cells against Streptococcus mutans were evaluated.

Data showed that the combination of propolis and chlorhexidine may favor the recognition of antigens by monocytes, slightly activates the NF-κB signaling pathway, and increases the bactericidal activity of human monocytes against S. mutans. Also, the combination played a role in anti-inflammatory cytokine production, which can be beneficial in the treatment of periodontal diseases. These results may have implications for the development of odontological products with immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory action, and may have further-reaching implications for the pharmaceutical industry.

Monday, January 16, 2017

New Method for Determining Antibacterial Components in Manuka Honey

Novel assay of antibacterial components in manuka honey using lucigenin-chemiluminescence-HPLC

Anal Chim Acta. 2017 Feb 15;954:151-158

Five components (hydrogen peroxide, methylglyoxal, dihydroxyacetone, fructose and glucose) of New Zealand manuka honey (Leptospermum scoparium) were analyzed using lucigenin chemiluminescence high-performance liquid chromatography (lucigenin-CL-HPLC). We focused on active oxygen species produced from the components in order to easily detect these five components contained in manuka honey. H2O2 and O2- generated from these components were identified by lucigenin-CL and electron spin resonance (ESR), and the bactericidal effect of ROS was confirmed using E. coli. The previously reported assays for Manuka honey components have low specificities and require complicated preprocessing methods.

As our results, the detection and identification of these components were possible within 30 min in lucigenin-CL-HPLC system, without any special treatment. It is considered that lucigenin-CL-HPLC is useful for the quality control and the analysis of various honey.

Sunday, January 15, 2017

New Brazilian Propolis Studied

New propolis type from northeast Brazil: chemical composition, antioxidant activity and botanical origin

J Sci Food Agric. 2017 Jan 11

BACKGROUND:

Propolis is a bee product with wide diversity of biological activity. It has complex composition, which is dependent on its botanical source. The present work aimed at determining the chemical profile, antioxidant activity and botanical origin of two samples of a propolis type from two locations of the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN, northeast Brazil).

RESULTS:

The standard chemical characteristics of the RN propolis are similar or superior to the internationally marketed Brazilian green propolis. RN propolis from two locations have high antioxidant activity, corresponding to 10% (municipality of Afonso Bezerra) and 13% (municipality of Alto do Rodrigues) of quercetin activity by the DPPH method and to 15% (both locations) by the β-carotene discoloration method. HPLC-DAD-MS/MS analyses revealed that most constituents of the RN propolis are flavonoids, mainly flavonols and chalcones. HPLC-DAD analysis of ethanol extracts revealed a great similarity between the chemical profile of RN propolis and shoot apices of "jurema-preta" (Mimosa tenuiflora, Leguminosae, Mimosoideae).

CONCLUSION:

"Jurema-preta" shoot apices are likely resin sources of RN propolis. The chemical characteristics and antioxidant property of RN propolis provide promising prospects for the introduction of this type of propolis into the apicultural market.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Royal Jelly May Help Treat Obesity

Royal jelly ameliorates diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance by promoting brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in mice


Obesity Research & Clinical Practice

Available online 11 January 2017

Introduction

Identification of thermogenic food ingredients is potentially a useful strategy for the prevention of obesity and related metabolic disorders. It has been reported that royal jelly (RJ) supplementation improves insulin sensitivity; however, its impacts on energy expenditure and adiposity remain elusive. We investigated anti-obesity effects of RJ supplementation and their relation to physical activity levels and thermogenic capacities of brown (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT).

Methods

C57BL/6J mice were fed under four different experimental conditions for 17 weeks: normal diet (ND), high fat diet (HFD), HFD with 5% RJ, and HFD with 5% honey bee larva powder (BL). Spontaneous locomotor activity, hepatic triglyceride (TG) content, and blood parameters were examined. Gene and protein expressions of thermogenic uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX-IV) in BAT and WAT were investigated by qPCR and Western blotting analysis, respectively.

Results

Dietary RJ, but not BL, suppressed HFD-induced accumulations of WAT and hepatic TG without modifying food intake. Consistently, RJ improved hyperglycemia and the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Although dietary RJ and BL unchanged locomotor activity, gene and protein expressions of UCP1 and COX-IV in BAT were increased in the RJ group compared to the other experimental groups. Neither the RJ nor BL treatment induced browning of WAT.

Conclusion

Our results indicate that dietary RJ ameliorates diet-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, and hepatic steatosis by promoting metabolic thermogenesis in BAT in mice. RJ may be a novel promising food ingredient to combat obesity and metabolic disorders.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Green Propolis Displays Better Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities

Artepillin C and phenolic compounds responsible for antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of green propolis and Baccharis dracunculifolia DC

Aims

This study investigates the antimicrobial activity in Staphylococcus aureus isolates (MSSA – Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA – Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and antioxidant activity of green propolis, Baccharis dracunculifolia DC extracts and Artepillin C™.


Methods and Results

The amount of Artepillin C in different extracts was determined by HPLC analysis. Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations 90 (MIC90) was determined using 40 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus inoculated in Müeller-Hinton agar culture medium containing the green-propolis and Baccharis dracunculifolia DC extracts. PVEE (green propolis ethanolic extract) and BDEH (Baccharis dracunculifolia hexanic extract) showed the greatest antimicrobial activity with MIC90 values of 246.3 and 295.5 μg/mL, respectively. Green propolis ethanolic and hexanic extracts (PVEE and PVEH respectively) showed the greatest antioxidant activity assessed by DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazylradical) with IC50 values of 13.09 and 95.86 μg/mL, respectively.

Conclusions

Green propolis ethanolic is displays better antimicrobial and antioxidant activities compared to other extracts. These activities may be related to the presence of Artepillin C in synergism with the other constituents of the extracts.

Significance and impact of the study

In this study, the antimicrobial activity of the extracts of green propolis and Baccharis dracunculifolia DC demonstrated in MRSA an MSSA clinical isolates indicated that they can be important tools to treat infections caused by these bacteria.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Stingless Bee Propolis from South Sulawesi, Indonesia Suppresses Dental Pulp Inflammation

Interleukin-6 expression on inflamed rat dental pulp tissue after capped with Trigona sp. propolis from south Sulawesi, Indonesia 

Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences

Available online 28 December 2016

Background: Propolis is a natural product of plant resins collected by honeybees from various plant sources. It is used as a remedy in folk medicine since ancient times because of its several biological and pharmacological properties. Recently, propolis has been used by dentist to treat various oral diseases. It was always mentioned as an anti-inflammatory agent. Cytokines are proteins that provide communication between cells and play a critical role in a wide variety of processes. It released from cells in an inflammatory process that active, mediate or potential actions of other cells or tissues. When dental pulp has inflammation, several pro-inflammatory cytokines including Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was released by innate immune cells.

Objective: To analyse the expression of IL-6 on inflamed rat dental pulp tissue following application of propolis.

Material and methods: Trigona sp. propolis was obtained from Luwu Regency, south Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. Flavonoid and non-flavonoid extracts were purified from propolis using thin layer chromatography. The study was applied on 80 male Sprague Dawley rats, 10–12 weeks of age, divided randomly and equally into 5 groups. Group I, as negative control group was not conducted any treatment. At group II, III, IV and V. A Class I cavity (Black Classification) were made on the occlusal surface of right maxillary first molar. The dental pulp was perforated using dental explorer and allowed in the oral environment for 1 h, after that, Ethanolic Extract Propolis (EEP) (Group II), Extract Flavonoid-Propolis (EFP) (Group III), Extract Non-Flavonoid Propolis (ENFP) (Group IV), or Calcium Hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) (Group V) were applied on dental pulp. All cavities were then filled with Glass Ionomer Cement as permanent filling. The rats being sacrificed in 6 h, 2 days, 4 days and 7 days. Sample biopsy were obtained, IL-6 expression was detected by using immunohistochemistry method. Data was analyzed statistically using Freidman and Kruskal Wallis tests with significance level of P < 0.05.

Results: All agent showed IL-6 expression in inflamed rat dental pulp tissue, and this expression was decreased with the longer of observation time periods. EEP more stronger to decreased IL-6 expression on inflamed rat dental pulp tissue than other agent. There is significant difference (P < 0.05) of IL-6 expression between group I and other groups in 6 h and 2 days but not in 4 and 7 days time periods.

Conclusion: Trigona sp. propolis from south Sulawesi, Indonesia could suppressed the expression of IL-6 on inflamed rat dental pulp tissue.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

International Apitherapy Symposium in Slovenia, May 26-28, 2017


You find more details at the official website.

SLOVENIAN APITHERAPY SOCIETY

Linhartova 49A, 1000 Slovenia, President: Aleš Mižigoj, phone.: +386 1 475 75 00, Mobile: +386 41 621 894, e-mail: apiterapija@medex.si

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Egyptian Propolis Protects Liver from Damage by Toxins

Effect of the Egyptian propolis on the hepatic antioxidant defense and pro-apoptotic p53 and anti-apoptotic bcl2 expressions in aflatoxin B1 treated male mice

Biomed Pharmacother. 2017 Jan 4;87:247-255

Aflatoxins are potent hepatotoxic due to their role in producing reactive oxygen species and consequently peroxidative damage. Propolis is a honey bee product known for its antioxidant capacity. The aim of this study was to verify the antioxidant effect of the Egyptian propolis extract (EPE) against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Forty eight male mice were divided: first, second and third groups were used as control receiving saline, olive oil and EPE respectively, fourth was AFB1 group, fifth and sixth received EPE post or pre AFB1 treatment, respectively. EPE was given as (0.2mg/kg) 3 times a week. AFB1 was given as a single dose (0.25μg/kg).

After 2 weeks, the mice were scarified and biochemical, histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations were assessed. EPE has a high content of total phenolics and alkaloids. The inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) value for DPPH radical scavenging was 1353.8μg/mL. Pretreatment with EPE improved AFB1-induced hepatotoxicity represented in lowering alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, cholesterol, triglycerides, lipid peroxidation and pro-apoptotic p53 expression to 33.48±1.98 IU/ml, 53.00±2.37 IU/ml, 123.50±2.02 IU/ml, 76.50±2.66mg/dl, 54.00±3.03mg/dl, 2.22±0.14 nmol/g and 4.31±2.1 cells/field and raising the reduced glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase and anti-apoptotic bcl2 expression to 3.37±1.65 nmol/g, 4.92±0.25 nmol/g, 57±0.91UI/g and 39.7±5.9 cells/field which all had non-significant differences with the control, respectively.

In conclusion, EPE can attenuate aflatoxin B1-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

Monday, January 09, 2017

Honey and Wound Healing: An Update

Am J Clin Dermatol. 2017 Jan 6

For centuries, honey has been utilized for wound healing purposes. In recent times, this specific topic has become a field of interest, possibly due to the advent of antibiotic resistance in microbial pathogens. With constant technological advancement, the information regarding honey's mechanisms of action on wound healing has accumulated at a rapid pace. Similarly, clinical studies comparing honey with traditional wound care therapies are steadily emerging.

As a follow-up to a previous review published in the journal in 2011, the current review article outlines publications regarding honey and wound healing that have been published between June 2010 and August 2016. Here we describe the most recent evidence regarding multiple types of honey and their mechanisms of action as antimicrobial agents, immunologic modulators, and physiologic mediators. In addition, outcomes of clinical studies involving a multitude of cutaneous wounds are also examined.