Thursday, September 17, 2020

Apitherapy Clinic Opened in Canada to Treat Lyme Disease, Arthritis, Immune Disorders


Niagara man builds plan for new clinic on the backs of bees

Gord Howard

His father and grandfather were beekeepers back in Paraguay. Unger, who came to Canada in 1974, keeps about five million of them in hives at BY’s Honey Farm in Niagara-on-the-Lake.

He takes a bit of honey every day like a daily vitamin, and is a firm believer that bees and their byproducts can help help the body heal both physically and mentally.

Later this month he will open what he believes will be Canada’s first apitherapy clinic, using bee venom to ease the pain of people suffering a wide variety of ailments including Lyme disease, arthritis and an immune system weakened by chemotherapy...

Friday, September 11, 2020

Amy Schumer Has Lyme Disease — Why Do People Think Bees Can Help?


What is bee sting therapy?

Bee sting therapy is a form of apitherapy, which is an alternative treatment using products from honeybees. Along with bee sting venom, apitherapy can include honey, propolis, bee pollen, beeswax, and royal jelly.

"This strategy has been used in alternative medicine for more than 5,000 years," one study explains. "It consists of either indirect application, by extracting bee venom (BV) with an electric stimulus followed by its injection into the body or directly via bee stings."

To apply bee sting therapy directly, bees are held with a tweezer and placed onto a particular part of the body. After it stings, the bee is removed, but the stinger remains in the body for a short period of time.

This treatment was recently featured in the Netflix docuseries (Un)Well, so many people around the world were exposed to the idea of apitherapy to help manage symptoms of Lyme disease. In the sixth episode of the show, the founder of Heal Hive, Brooke Geahan, calls bee venom an antibacterial, antiviral, anti-parasitic, and an anti-inflammatory.

She then explains one property of bee venom, called melittin, which supposedly breaks into the cell walls containing the Lyme disease bacteria (B. burgdorferi) and causes them to burst...

Thursday, September 03, 2020

Korean Propolis Can Prevent H. pylori-Induced Gastric Damage (Ulcers)


Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect of Korean propolis on Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric damage in vitro


Journal of Microbiology (2020)

Helicobacter pylori, present in the stomach lining, is a Gramnegative bacterium that causes various gastrointestinal diseases, including gastritis and peptic ulcers. Propolis is a natural resinous substance collected from a variety of plants, and contains several natural bioactive substances. 

The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of Korean propolis on H. pylori-induced damage in the human adenocarcinoma gastric cell line. The propolis used in this study was obtained from the Korea Beekeeping Association in South Korea. The expression of pro-inflammatory interleukins (ILs), such as IL-8, IL-12, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, which was increased after H. pylori infection, significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner upon pretreatment with Korean propolis, because of the suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor kB pathway. 

The anti-oxidative activity of propolis was assessed using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate free radical assay. Korean propolis showed significant anti-oxidative effects via reactive oxygen species scavenging. In addition, pretreatment with Korean propolis upregulated the expression of anti-oxidant enzymes through Nrf2 signaling activation. These findings indicate that the use of Korean propolis, which has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects, can be promising for the prevention of H. pylori-induced gastric damage.

Wednesday, September 02, 2020

Honey Bee Venom Rapidly Kills Aggressive Breast Cancer Cells


Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research study finds honeybee venom rapidly kills aggressive breast cancer cells


By Nicolas Perpitch

Venom from honeybees has been found to rapidly kill aggressive and hard-to-treat breast cancer cells, according to potentially groundbreaking new Australian research.

Key points:
  • The research was published in the journal Nature Precision Oncology
  • It found honeybee venom was effective in killing breast cancer cells
  • Researchers say the discovery is exciting but there is a long way to go
The study also found when the venom's main component was combined with existing chemotherapy drugs, it was extremely efficient at reducing tumour growth in mice...

Wednesday, August 26, 2020

Bee Venom Therapy Used to Treat Psoriasis


3 Interesting Types of Bee Venom Therapy

Bee stings typically cause painful swelling to the infected area due to venom. The venom or apitoxin has numerous compounds, enzymes, and amino acids that can be used to treat several health conditions.

Medical uses for bee venom have been traced back to the Ancient Egyptians, in Europe and Asia. The Greek physician Hippocrates used bee stings to treat arthritis and other joint pain. Other healers have used the venom for other conditions such as skin rashes.

Today, the venom enzymes have been found to have anti-inflammatory properties as well as ease pain and help heal wounds. There had also been several therapies involving immune system conditions such as eczema, rheumatoid arthritis, and even neurological diseases like Alzheimer's. Here are three types of been sting venom therapy:

For Psoriasis

A small study with 50 volunteers participated in an experiment for bee venom as therapy for skin lesions. Half of the patients with psoriasis had weekly injections of apitoxin while the rest received a placebo. After 3 months of bee sting venom therapy, patients had significantly reduced levels of inflammatory blood markers and psoriasis plaques.

Thursday, August 20, 2020

New Study Confirms Honey is Better Than Antibiotics at Treating Colds and Coughs


By Divya Ramaswamy
  • Honey has been used for thousands of years as a home remedy for colds and coughs
  • However, its effectiveness in treating common cough or flu hadn’t been studied heavily
  • Now, experts at Oxford University’s Medical School and Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences found honey to be a more effective, safer, cheaper and readily available alternative to antibiotics
Honey can treat colds and coughs better than antibiotics or the usual over-the-counter medicines, a new study revealed.

Despite being a popular home remedy for coughs, the effectiveness of honey in treating these illnesses hasn’t been studied heavily. But, experts at Oxford University’s Medical School and Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences have now analyzed existing evidence to find out how upper respiratory infection symptoms like cough, sneezing, sore throat, and runny nose responded to treatment with honey.

They conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis, while searching several databases. The experts then identified 14 studies involving more than 1,700 participants of varying ages. Analysis of these studies revealed that, compared to usual care, honey improved cough frequency and severity. A couple of studies pointed out treatment with honey offered faster results and the symptoms lasted one or two days less.

The good old home remedy was found to be a more effective, safer, cheaper and readily available alternative to antibiotics in relieving symptoms of colds and flu-like illnesses. However, no specific type of honey was touted to be the best...

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Honey Massage is Safe, Has Detoxifying Effect


Safety and detoxification effect of honey massage

Volume 13 Issue 4 -2020
August 2020

Background: Medical massage has positive health effects during treatments or rehabilitation. Massage with honey said to be useful also for detoxification, for which the evidence is limited.

Aim/Purpose: To study the safety and detoxification effect of honey massage. Does honey massage remove trace elements (e.g. manganese) from the body, which is recommended for daily intake: is honey massage safe? Can honey massage remove harmful elements or compounds from the body? Participants Experiment 1: Two groups are built: One group from Manganese mine worker (3 persons), and none-mine worker (4 persons). All seven-person was evaluated separately. Experiment 2: We built three groups. The first group was consuming bio certified meat and vegetables, the second the bio vegetarian and the third group regular, each group 3 persons.

Research design: The subjects were massaged with honey. During the massage, the texture of the honey changes and absorbs certain substances from the skin (we name it M-honey for Massage-Honey). The composition of the original and M-honey was examined. Main outcome measures: In the first series, we examined M-honey’s for twenty-seven elements, including heavy metals. In the second series, each group’s M-honey was analysed for content of 502 complex chemicals.

Results: Concerning minerals, including manganese, the amount of effluent was so small that the honey massage did not endanger the homeostasis of the body. It was found that the M-honey was able to remove a small amount of Al Ba, Ni, Sr. One group contained the neurotoxic permethrin.

Conclusion: Honey massage has been shown to be safe and to has a detoxifying effect. However, other massage techniques have not been compared to honey massage, so we do not know whether the detoxifying effect is a specific feature of honey massage or is a common feature of several massage techniques.

Thursday, August 13, 2020

Could bee sting therapy possibly have a role in COVID-19 treatment?


Could bee sting therapy possibly have a role in COVID-19 treatment? Maybe. Maybe not. Should in-depth, scientific research be launched?


Author: Kathy Keatley Garvey

FROM: https://apitherapy.org/

"A total of 5115 beekeepers were surveyed from February 23 to March 8, including 723 in Wuhan, the outbreak epicentre of Hubei. None of these beekeepers developed symptoms associated with COVID-19, and their health was totally normal. After that, we interviewed five apitherapists in Wuhan and followed 121 patients of their apitherapy clinic. These patients had received apitherapy from October 2019 to December 2019, and all the five bee apitherapists have the habit of self-apitherapy for their own health care (apitherapy means making use of bee venom from the honeybee's sting to treat or prevent certain diseases). Without any protective measures, two of the five apitherapists were exposed to suspected COVID-19 cases and others were exposed to confirmed COVID-19 cases, but none of them were infected eventually. None of the 121 patients were infected by SARS-CoV-2, and three of them had close contact with immediate family members who were confirmed SARS-CoV-2 Infection cases.

Could bee sting therapy possibly have a role in COVID-19 treatment?Maybe. Maybe not. Should in-depth, scientific research be launched?

Yes, say a trio of researchers in an article published in sciencedirect.com.

Lead author Wei Yang, an oncologist from China, and two associates related some interesting but anecdotal information about beekeepers in the COVID-19 epicenter, the Hubei province. The beekeepers surveyed didn't contract the COVID-19 virus. Neither did a group of surveyed patients receiving apitherapy.

"A total of 5115 beekeepers were surveyed from February 23 to March 8, including 723 in Wuhan, the outbreak epicentre of Hubei. None of these beekeepers developed symptoms associated with COVID-19, and their health was totally normal. After that, we interviewed five apitherapists in Wuhan and followed 121 patients of their apitherapy clinic. These patients had received apitherapy from October 2019 to December 2019, and all the five bee apitherapists have the habit of self-apitherapy for their own health care (apitherapy means making use of bee venom from the honeybee's sting to treat or prevent certain diseases). Without any protective measures, two of the five apitherapists were exposed to suspected COVID-19 cases and others were exposed to confirmed COVID-19 cases, but none of them were infected eventually. None of the 121 patients were infected by SARS-CoV-2, and three of them had close contact with immediate family members who were confirmed SARS-CoV-2 Infection cases. It might be supposed that beekeepers are less likely to be exposed to SARS-CoV-2 because they live in less densely populated rural areas. But the five apitherapists and their patients are from densely populated areas in Wuhan. These people have one thing in common: they develop a tolerance to bee sting."

The co-authors pointed out that "It reminds us the story of the discovery of cowpox and the eventual victory of humans over this disease (Bennett and Baxby, 1996)."

Wednesday, August 12, 2020

9 Evidence-Based Manuka Honey Health Benefits (Colds, Flu, Wound Healing, Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Bacterial, Ulcers, Athletic Performance)


While more research is needed to endorse its use in a clinical setting, early results using sterilised, laboratory-tested manuka honey in limited, small-scale studies have been promising. Scroll on for nine evidence-backed manuka honey...

Wednesday, August 05, 2020

Mexican University Researchers Recommend Propolis to Prevent COVID-19/Coronavirus Infection


UNAM scientists recommend taking propolis to prevent COVID – 19 – Very Interesting

Although there is still no medicine to treat COVID-19, UNAM recommends the use of propolis to keep the immune response in check.

The Faculty of Higher Studies Cuautitlán of the UNAM recommended the preventive use of this substance made by bees against COVID-19 and other viral diseases, such as seasonal influenza, thanks to the biological activity it has on viral, fungal and bacterial microorganisms.

Dr. Tonatiuh Cruz Sánchez, head of the Propolis Microbiological Bioprospecting Analysis Laboratory, explained that among the more than 300 chemical compounds observed over a decade of laboratory research, the phenols and flavonoids are responsible for their antimicrobial and probably antiviral action:

“Within the phenols is the phenethyl ester of caffeic acid (CAPE), which acts on polymerase, an enzyme capable of replicating an infectious microorganism, making it an excellent antibacterial. Also, flavonoids contain antioxidants such as pinocembrin and quercetin, which are attributed antiviral activity, “UNAM explained in a statement...

Tuesday, August 04, 2020

Slovenia Uses Sounds of Honey Bees as an Anti-Stress, Anti-Anxiety Relaxation Aid


How Slovenia uses the sound of bees to relax

By Martina Zoldos
30th July 2020

The country has a time-honoured tradition of using the sounds of bees buzzing to relax everyone from firefighters to school children, acting as an alleviant for anxiety and stress.

In our high-stress, modern society, there’s luckily no shortage of relaxation aids: bedtime story audio apps, phone-free offices, or ASMR, hypnotic YouTube videos of people whispering or crinkling wrapping paper into a microphone to help people drift to sleep.

But in Slovenia, there’s one relaxation technique that may actually shock some people, especially entomophobes: lying down in a room filled with cages of thousands of buzzing bees...

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

1st International Apitherapy Zoom Conference from 6 to 8 September 2020, Katowice, Poland


1st International Apitherapy Conference from 6 to 8 of September 2020 Katowice

From 6 to 8 of September, the 1st International Apitherapy Conference will be organized as ZOOM Conference under the auspices of the Medical University of Silesia, International Federation of Apitherapy, Romanian Apitherapy Society and German Apitherapy Society. Our goal is to present the latest developments of using bee products in medicine, pharmacy and cosmetology. The conference will be a forum for the exchange of experience in the field of apitherapy for representatives of scientific centers from Poland and abroad.

We would like to exchange scientific experience and present our achievements at the conference. Let’s meet on Zoom us.

Thursday, July 23, 2020

Australian, Malaysian, Brazilian Stingless Bee Honey Has Special Health Properties


Science sweetens native honey health claims

By University of Queensland

Science has validated Indigenous wisdom by identifying a rare, healthy sugar in native stingless bee honey that is not found in any other food.

University of Queensland organic chemist Associate Professor Mary Fletcher said Indigenous peoples had long known that native stingless bee honey had special health properties.

"We tested honey from two Australian native stingless bee species, two in Malaysia and one in Brazil and found that up to 85 per cent of their sugar is trehalulose, not maltose as previously thought," she said.

Dr. Fletcher said trehalulose was a rare sugar with a low glycaemic index (GI), and not found as a major component in any other foods.

"Traditionally it has been thought that stingless bee honey was good for diabetes and now we know why—having a lower GI means it takes longer for the sugar to be absorbed into the blood stream, so there is not a spike in glucose that you get from other sugars," Dr. Fletcher said...

Sunday, July 19, 2020

Mayan Propolis Shows Strong Anti-Inflammatory Properties

In vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties of Mayan propolis

Propolis has been used traditionally for different human diseases and even recently as dental biomaterials because of its antibacterial, antimycotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, a proper correlation between in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties has not been clearly established.

...Chemical analysis showed pinocembrin, pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, and pinobanksin-3-O-propionate as the main components of propolis. Macrophage viability was high (106%) when propolis was used up to 50 µg/mL. ELISA studies showed a reduction in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) up to 145 pg/mL, 350 pg/mL, and 210pg/mL, respectively, while the anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and IL-4) were increased up to 833pg/mL and 446 pg/mL. Finally, edema was reduced on paw and ear mice by 9% and 22%, respectively.

Mayan propolis has strong in vitro anti-inflammatory properties without compromising macrophage
viability, resulting in a low-to-mild in vivo anti-inflammatory response.

Friday, July 17, 2020

Royal Jelly and Bee Pollen May Help Treat Menopausal Problems


Apitherapy for menopausal problems

Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2020 Jul 16

Purpose: Apitherapy, a method from the field of complementary and alternative medicine, claims that all health problems including menopausal problems can be cured using bee products, especially honey, bee-collected pollen, propolis, and royal jelly. This study was to investigate the recommendations of protagonists of holistic apitherapy and compare these to the current evidence.

Methods: Since holistic apitherapy is only promoted in books and apitherapeutical congresses, we identified books on the topic in English, French, and German language via bookseller platforms and the JUSTfind system of the Justus-Liebig-University Gießen, Germany, which comprises 337 databases from the EBSCO Discovery Service.

Results: Only 29.5% (n = 38) of the apitherapy books mentioned the topic of menopausal problems. Among these, there were 24 different recommendations. Royal jelly is the number one recommended therapy, followed by pollen, the combination of pollen and royal jelly, and propolis. All other recommendations are mentioned just once. The recommendation regarding royal jelly must be regarded as correct. Strictly speaking, evidence regarding bee-collected pollen is poor, since all studies on pollen did not investigate pollen directly, but pollen extracts and these pollens came from pollen that was anemophilous but not entomophilous.

Conclusion: Royal jelly and pollen could be interesting treatment options in cases of menopausal symptoms. In order to promote bee products for menopausal symptoms with a good conscience trials, comparing bee products against other options, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, C. racemosa extracts, and/or yoga should be initiated, since these methods have already proven their value.